Sunday, 19 July 2009

Chocolate Dip Cushion

Here's a Finished Object I never posted. This lay around as a UFO for certainly more than a year; a few weeks ago I bought a cushion the right size to go in it, worked in the ends and sewed on some miscelleanous buttons from my sewing box.



It's worked from corner to corner in garter stitch, front and back seperately. I worked a triangle from the point, increasing with a yarn-over at each end, then changed colour and did yo, k3tog at each end, decreasing down to the opposite point. As far as I remember the increases/decreases were on alternate rows. That left me with two squares, each with a row of neat little holes around each edge.

I crocheted front and back together through the holes around three sides, then along just one layer of the fourth, leaving the other layer with its holes free. Then I forgot all about it, and then later for a while I used it to store stuffing for cuddly animals.



Eventually I put a cushion inside and sewed some buttons on, using the holes of the open side as buttonholes. I do think it's beautiful. It was just something to do with these two lovely natural-sheep colours of organic Welsh wool from iknit.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

what is "organic" wool?

is the sheep not fed on pesticide treated grass?

msHedgehog said...

I suppose so. Like 'organic' eggs - you don't give certain foods to the chickens and you don't put certain things on what they eat. There are special rules about antibiotics and whatnot. I don't think it makes a blind bit of difference to the wool, I buy it because I like the colours and textures it comes in, but the arguments for good effects on the soil are stronger.

londontango said...

Nice one. I will have to remember this when I get back to knitting again!

maya said...

I like it too, specially the multitasking parts of it, learning tool for new techniques, storing uses and above all the delicious name.
Regarding the term organic wool; I thought it also covered the way the fleece was treated during the process to convert it into yarn.